Go-live Week 2 – good numbers, and the triple intersection of complexity

We’ve been live on Epic in inpatient now for two weeks and we’re cautiously very happy with our results. Direct entry of orders by physicians is stable at just over 90%, with the balance being orders written on paper in settings we planned for (chemotherapy and pediatric TPN) and verbal or telephone orders.  We’re digging in to our live data on verbal and telephone orders to see how they cluster and how we can continue to reduce them. Revenues remain within the margin of variation, and our near-term clinical metrics (door-to-floor, average length of stay, etc) are unchanged to slightly improved. The very interesting clinical outcomes, like rates of medication error or risk-adjusted mortality, await more data.

Our knottiest workflows in the system are what Epic calls (a little strangely) “Hospital Outpatient Departments”. These are facilities that serve both inpatients and outpatients, like interventional radiology and the endoscopy suite, and so require a mix of inpatient and outpatient workflow and software. If the patient needs full anesthesia for the procedure, as is often the case with child patients, you have a triple-intersection of complexity. In our paper-based prior existence this was all smoothed over by smart people with lots of institutional knowledge and the right relationships. They knew how to get anything done. In preparing for an integrated EHR we put a great deal of effort in to analyzing this work prospectively, but the magnitude of change brought by automation has had unintended effects. No surprise, and we’re crunching through all those processes again with the benefit of experiencing the system in real life, and the problems continue to look solvable.

Meanwhile our clinicians continue to ask deeper and more interesting questions about the system, moving from “How do I get my job done?”, to “How do I manage this complex discharge?”, and on to “Our Division wants to start publishing custom packages of SmartLinks and we want to send people to Wisconsin. Whom do we talk to?”

[ Special welcome to the Twitter followers of UCSF Division of Hospital Medicine chief Bob Wachter, physician-leader extraordinaire and blogger at Wachter’s World. ]

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